Yahoo Weather

You are here

Club News

Submitted photo(Above) At the Oct. 8 Nevada Kiwanis meeting, Carol Bell (left) introduced April Heintz. April owns Scriptive Solutions, which works with vinyl lettering. April was instrumental in printing and providing Cub Pride T-shirts for all the kids at Central Elementary free of charge. Thanks, Carol and April for your great work.
Submitted photo(Above) At the Oct. 8 Nevada Kiwanis meeting, Carol Bell (left) introduced April Heintz. April owns Scriptive Solutions, which works with vinyl lettering. April was instrumental in printing and providing Cub Pride T-shirts for all the kids at Central Elementary free of charge. Thanks, Carol and April for your great work.
Submitted photoThe Nevada Kiwanis pancake breakfast committee met Oct. 8 to finalize details about the breakfast. Pictured are (in the foreground) Sue Seaton; (then clockwise around the table) Dean Handsaker, Joel Hutchison, Bob Mittman, Jody Melcher, Patrick Scully and Linda Shickell.
Submitted photoThe Nevada Kiwanis pancake breakfast committee met Oct. 8 to finalize details about the breakfast. Pictured are (in the foreground) Sue Seaton; (then clockwise around the table) Dean Handsaker, Joel Hutchison, Bob Mittman, Jody Melcher, Patrick Scully and Linda Shickell.
Submitted photoPictured are Rotarian Jon Augustus, left, with Neal Bohnet of the American Cancer Society.
Submitted photoPictured are Rotarian Jon Augustus, left, with Neal Bohnet of the American Cancer Society.
Submitted photoMargaret Horowitz of YSS spoke to the Nevada Lions recently about the need for mentors in our local school. She was given a token of appreciation from Lions member John Beals.
Submitted photoMargaret Horowitz of YSS spoke to the Nevada Lions recently about the need for mentors in our local school. She was given a token of appreciation from Lions member John Beals.

Nevada Rotary

President Dan Johnson called the Oct. 9 meeting to order at 12:20 p.m., followed by the Pledge of Allegiance, prayer, and Four Way Test. Welcome was extended to visiting Rotarians: Ken Janssen, Ellen Herrman, Mike Phillips, Don Borcherding, and Ted Tosteler.

Reports were given by Lynn Scarlett from the Chamber regarding the following upcoming events: Downtown Trick or Treat on Oct. 29, and the ABWA Craft Show on Nov. 9 and 10.

Elizabeth Hansen from the City of Nevada updated the group on the Mix and Mingle tonight at the Nevada Fire Department, Lincoln Highway closed this morning, K Avenue in front of the Post Office will be closed for repair, Ric Martinez has been promoted to Public Safety Director, the Library will be hosting a Sneak Peek on Tuesday, Oct. 22 from 5 to 7 p.m., and she reminded everyone to vote on Nov. 5.

Megan Pringnitz, a Nevada Junior Rotarian, reported on the upcoming school activities: volleyball, football, and cross country. Loyd Brown, Rotary Membership Chair, announced that Nov. 13 has been set as the date for the new member meeting for Nevada Noon Rotary. Sign up sheets are on tables for members to list possible new members for the club. Mark Cahill did a markets report for the membership. Jim Frevert reported there had been an accident at a Hertz farm this morning.

Jon Augustus introduced Neal Bohnet of the American Cancer Society as the program for Oct. 9. Neal has been with the American Cancer Society for three-and-a-half years. His position is the Regional Community Relations Director for Eastern and Central Iowa. The American Cancer Society is the #1 cancer fighting society in the world. They celebrated their 100th anniversary in May 2013. There are currently 11 research grants in Iowa: 10 are at the University of Iowa and one is at Iowa State University. He reported on the Outreach Program available through the American Cancer Society. By visiting www.cancer.org patients are connected with ways to find help with physicians or co-pays. The Hope Lodge is located in Iowa City and is a place to stay for cancer patients. All food, lodging, and transportation is free for the patients. Cancer is not a death sentence anymore – there is currently a 76 percent survival rate. Forty-six new cases of cancer are diagnosed every day.

Bernie Stephenson invited members to share brags and then handed out his “fines”. The meeting adjourned at 12:55 p.m.

Nevada Lions Club

The Nevada Lion’s Club met Oct. 9 at Windsor Manor. Second Vice President Jayson Kingsbury called the meeting to order at 6:30 p.m.

After dinner we sang several songs, accompanied by Marilyn Argotsinger, and to tell the truth, we would just as soon just listen to Marilyn play the piano - she adds much to our meetings and we thank her for helping us out. Lion Tamer Paul Malsom stumped most of us with his usual nonsensical questions.

Lion John Beals introduced our speaker for the evening, Margaret Horowitz, who works for YSS . Her program was about the need for mentors in our local school. She said being a mentor was primarily being a friend and a listener and meeting with a student at least once a week. She urged us to consider being a mentor, and those of us who have been mentors reiterated that for the short time it takes, it is a very fulfilling time for both the student and mentor. We thanked Margaret for a very interesting and informational program.

Following our program, we had a short board meeting to take care of the business for the month. Our next meeting will be Oct. 23, 6:30 p.m., at Windsor Manor

Golden K Kiwanis

Vice President Dale Sloan presided over the Oct. 8 meeting of Golden K held at Memorial Lutheran Church. Thirty-one members and three guests were greeted by Bill Ward. Darrell Staley gave the invocation.

The guest speaker was Jami Hill, branch manager at First Mortgage Company, 1120 Sixth St., in Nevada. The company focuses only on mortgages and offers excellent new construction, FHA and USDA loans. Mrs. Hill stressed that all loans are underwritten in Des Moines and not sold to other companies. Closing costs run from $1700 to $1750. First Mortgage will match any lower interest rates offered by other lenders.

Mrs. Hill answered several questions from Golden K members and gave valuable tips on acquiring and maintaining a good credit score. To build good credit, an individual should have revolving debt by way of a credit card and secured debt such as a home mortgage or auto loan. Of course, payments should be made on time. To avoid lowering one’s credit score, a person should not get multiple credit cards, cancel credit cards or request a credit report unless absolutely necessary. We thank Mrs. Hill for this timely financial information.

Steven Jordening will speak at the Oct. 15 meeting of Golden K on the topic of medical directives. Story County Conservationist Steve Lekwa is the guest speaker scheduled for Oct. 22. We encourage and welcome all guests to join us at our 9 a.m. meetings!

Bev Packard won the 50/50 drawing at the close of the meeting.

DAR

Nevada Chapter Solomon Dean met at Windsor Manor for lunch Monday, Oct. 7. After duly opening the chapter, Regent Betty Katzer presented a program taken from a book written by Laurie Halse Anderson titled, “Independent Dames” and subtitled, “What you never knew about the Women and Girls of the American Revolution.” There is an interesting section on truths and falsehoods about the heroics of women. The ones reviewed here are stories that have been substantiated.

What did the women and girls really do? Sybil Ludington was 16 when she rode her horse 40 miles through a dark rainy night to spread the news of a British attack, and rounded up 400 militiamen to fight back. Remember Paul Revere? Not to slight him one single bit, but his ride was only 16 miles. Deborah Champion, on a two-day ride to get messages and money to George Washington, was stopped by the British and fooled them into thinking that she was an old lady on her way to visit friends.

We have all read and know about the war works of Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Martha Jefferson, Betsy Ross, Elizabeth Stanton, Phyllis Wheatley and other well-known ladies.. But there were almost 80 women and girls known to be heavily involved in the fight for independence that are written about in this book.

Many women gathered into a group calling itself the Daughters of Liberty. Weaving thread and yarn into what was called homespun, they produced enough clothing to take care of an entire company of soldiers.

“Mom” Rinker would take her laundry to sun-bleach at the edge of a cliff high above a beach.. While she knitted, she would let her ball of yarn drop over the cliff side. Inside the yarn were secret notes that were retrieved by the American soldiers at the bottom of the cliff.

When the British marched into Boston, New York City and Philadelphia, they moved into private homes with American mothers and homemakers cooking and washing their clothes. This was a chance for the women had to spy on the British, and spy they did. They were perfectly placed to become excellent spies. Listening to British scolders talk they learned of plans, which they quickly relayed to American troops. In response to the success of the spying, the British became incensed and openly killed spies they caught, both male and female.

Women and girls were the support group behind the American soldiers. They made sure that the men had food, clothes and shoes. They melted down knives, forks, spoons and pewter for bullets. Private homes were turned into hospitals, women into nurses to care for the wounded. There was an epidemic of smallpox; women inoculated everyone they could against the disease.

While women legally could not become soldiers, wives and children would often join their soldier husbands and cook, wash and carry ammunition. If a husband was killed, the wife would grab his weapon and blast away. A few women disguised themselves as men and took on the role of soldier.

The Revolution lasted from 1775-1783. As the author stated., “pioneer dames were tough.”

There were dramatic changes when the war ended in victory for our country, but another dramatic change was the self-image that women had always held of themselves. They recognized newly found strengths that had emerged during the war and knew that they would forever be changed by that knowledge.

A luncheon/meeting will be held at Windsor Manor Monday, Nov. 4.

Close
The Nevada Journal website is available only to print and digital subscribers. If you are already a subscriber, you can access the website at no additional charge.